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My Blog SCRIBBLE AND EDIT reflects my love of creative writing, design, literature and film. Check out my Poems & haiku, Romantic Flash Fiction; Blogfest Entries; Blog Awards and other prose and Flash Fiction. Do bear with me, as I will reciprocate with those genuine commenters on my blog.  BTW I sometimes withhold comments for challenges until later. Comments about the post are much appreciated. Thank you.
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Tuesday, 23 August 2011

Spark Blogfest

Hosted by: ChristineTyler Writer Coaster

What book made you realize you were doomed to be a writer?
What author set off that spark of inspiration for your current Work in Progress?Or, Is there a book or author that changed your world view?
Imagine a little girl who had few friends, who lived in a little dream-world all her own, where she drew pictures and made up stories and turned them into little books on every conceivable topic open to a five year old+ mind.

She developed an imaginary friend called John. She also liked to compose letters and poems. Despite being a slow reader and often making mistakes with punctutaion and spelling, this was her medium. This love of writing was not so much inspired specifically by another author or a particular story, though she enjoyed fairytales and nursery rhymes that her mother shared with her.
This love of writing was how she could express her thoughts and emotions; the way she could lose herself in other worlds and moments. This was how she could imagine a world that didn't include bullies; a world where she had a labrador as a companion and where she was happy and safe.

One of these early stories involved me owning a dog called Gladstone and ... ah well I might resurrect that idea so maybe I'll keep it under my hat for now...

How about you?

21 comments:

  1. When, as a child, I got asked "What do you want to be when you grow up?", in my head I always answered "A writer" - but I never said the words aloud... I didn't think about WHAT I'd write, and it was years before poetry and rhyme chose for me! LOL

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  2. Oh beautiful Madeleine! May words and stories continue to give you the power to escape into something wonderful and ethereal! I hope you get to write about Gladstone soon! Take care
    x

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  3. I always wanted to write. Two books made the decision for me. Roald Dahl's 'George's Marvellous Medicine' andthe 'BFG'

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  4. You said this so well (like most of your posts)

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  5. I had an imaginary dog, too. Probably why I didn't realize how much goes into caring for the real thing.
    As a child I thought every kid wrote stories when then weren't outside playing. Imagine my surprise when I realized that wasn't true.

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  6. I've wanted to be a writer since I was little, too! I loved reading so much and couldn't get enough, so I wrote my own stories. In second and third grade my best friend and I made up our own Story Club (got the idea from Anne of Green Gables!) in which I wrote the stories and she illustrated them. Too fun!

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  7. Aww! Wonderful story on how you always knew you wanted to write. :)

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  8. My love for writing is new-found. A few years back I never thought that I would start my own blog. :)
    Your story is very sweet Madeleine. As a child even I used to write a lot of short stories but never with the aim of writing professionally when I grew up :)

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  9. What a wonderful story. Thank you for sharing. I've always wanted to be a writer too. I have stuff I've written from that age including a poem about the moon that won third place at the town's fall fair. I pointed out there are holes on the moon but no cars. I guess it was important.

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  10. What a touching and wonderful Spark story. Great post!

    It's great to meet you, Madeleine!

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  11. I've always loved the way reading and writing can take you to far away places, can let you escape the ordinary.

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  12. As a kid, I was always "writing" in my head and also talking to myself! Geesh, did I just say that out loud??? I basically narrated my whole life like it was a movie! But it was a long time before I really wrote - on paper...Thanks for sharing - I love how these posts make us think about our paths as writers. We share so much in commong

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  13. love your spark story! and gladstone is a cool character name!

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  14. Lovely little journey you took us on with your spark post! :)

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  15. I wanted to either be a horse trainer or a writer. Rider vs. writer. :D My dad wasn't thrilled by either.

    My brother & I had an imaginary friend named Corn. I think it was more his friend though. I know we blamed a lot of things on Corn. Great name, huh?

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  16. Sounds like a super spark that Gladstone.

    I'm here from sparkfest and hope you'll stop by the Write Game to share the spark there.

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  17. As a child I immersed myself into books. My mother used to force me outdoors. I'd sit on the porch and wait till she'd let me back in so I could go back to reading.

    The Write Soil

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  18. Aw, I was exactly that same little girl, though in my world I had a German shepherd as opposed to a lab (though I love labs, too). Anyway, it's really neat to read the posts from writers who were inspired by their own writing! :-)

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  19. My oldest surviving manuscript was from 3rd grade, and entitled, "The Brane of the Class." It was a sci-fi romance.

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  20. Thanks everyone, I love to hear your stories too :O)

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